Squirrel monkey performing a trichromatic colour discrimination test following gene therapy. Image courtesy of the Neitz laboratory.

A Mantis Shrimp (Stomatopod) has between 12 and 16 types of photoreceptors cells (compared to 3 types in the human eye). They are capable of “spectral tuning” (ie. they can tune their colour vision to adapt to their environment). 

THE ANIMAL COLOUR DEBATE

Environment

250cm x 160cm x 300cm

School of Looking

2020

O7 OCT

29 NOV

2 0 2 0

InvisibleLight.html
InvisibleLight.html
 

Most mammals are dichromats, seeing two colours - blue and yellow - a simpler colour space than our own trichromatic vision, with its rich landscape of primary and secondary hues. But exactly what colours any animal can see will always be unknown unless we can find some way to ask them directly…

Talks are free but pre-booking is essential through Eventbrite.

To register click HERE!

If you missed one, you can see it HERE!

 

The floor of The Animal Colour Debate is a variation of Akiyoshi Kotaoka’s snake illusion, created with his kind permission.

SPECTRAL TUNING

Interactive installation

Programme on iMac

School of Looking

2020

A computer screen’s red, green and blue channels are comparable to the L, M and S cones that capture colour in the eye, though the signal passing through the optic nerve appeared to be more complex, working with oppositions of blue/yellow, red/green and black/white. Spectral Tuning rewires the red, green and blue channels of a camera to explore this sort of oppositional colour matrix.